The Many Layers Of Artist, Linnea Tobias

The Many Layers Of Artist, Linnea Tobias

I must make an admission here, at the start. . . I was nervous to meet artist, Linnea Tobias. Having seen her work for the first time over a year ago, I was immediately drawn in. The world created by her art is layered with colorful details, whimsical creatures, and a depth of vision that I thoroughly enjoy.

Since that first exposure, I’ve seen her art work in more and more places: coffee shops, galleries, small businesses, and even a friends home! After a while, finding her art became like an Easter egg hunt, a thrill to spot. As I became more familiar with her works, I also became curious about the artist. So while waiting for her to arrive for our interview, I was both excited and a little nervous to meet her. Of course, a low dose of panic set in when I realized that my phones wifi wasn’t working and I couldn’t access a picture by which to recognize her. Thankfully, Linnea found me.

Immediately putting me at ease with her gracious good humor, I found that Linnea is quick to smile, very kind, open minded and just generally fun to talk to. I had promised to keep our interview to 30 minutes, but over an hour later we were still chatting. Like her art, she is absolutely engaging.

Keep reading to learn more about this amazing, intuitive artist.

SnS: Linnea, please tell us who, or what, inspired your love of art?

L.T.: My grandfather used to take me to a little art supply store where he lived in Hot Springs, South Dakota. I loved going there – art supply stores are like candy stores for me! I would take my new supplies, hang out in his basement workshop, and draw. He made wood furniture, but he also liked to talk about drawing. My cousin is an artist and I remember as kids he would always have a sketchbook filled with amazing drawings and cartoons that he had created. I was fascinated by them.

SnS: Are you classically trained, or self taught?

L.T.: I always drew as a kid, but I also took quite a few classes as well. I studied art at Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA and spent my senior year in Europe, at the Aegean Center for the Fine Arts on the island of Paros, in Greece. I also took classes at Humboldt State University in Arcata, CA, a few years later.

SnS: So how long have you been in Spokane, what drew you here?

L.T.: After graduating from Evergreen State College in 1991, I moved to Mendocino, CA and lived there for a few years before moving to Arcata.  I moved to Spokane about three and a half years ago, when my husband landed a job here. I have a sister who lives here too, so this area wasn’t completely unfamiliar to me.

SnS: What mediums do you work with, and which is your favorite?

L.T.: I have worked with almost everything you can imagine, and I have liked all of it. I’ve worked with pastels, watercolor, oil, acrylics, encaustic, gouache, collage, colored pencil, printmaking, and clay. 

Currently, I love fluid acrylics, watercolor, and experimenting with a combination of encaustic and pyrography.

SnS: For folks like me, who are not artists, please explain encaustic and pyrography? I’m guessing pyrography has something to do with fire.

L.T.: Yes, it does. Pyrography is wood burning. Encaustic is a mixture of pigment, beeswax, and varnish. You heat the mixture up and use the resultant colored wax to “paint” with. It isn’t precise, but is fun to work with.

SnS: How would you describe your style, and which artists (if any) influenced it?

L.T.: I’ve always found that a hard question to answer. I love color and nature. I paint intuitively, starting with an idea or drawing that inspires me. I add pattern to it, or abstract imagery, and I put it together going with what feels right. It’s like putting together a puzzle, and only my intuitive self knows the answer.

Quite a few artists inspire me. Paul Klee, Pierre Bonnard, Gustav Klimt, and Odilon Redon are a few.

SnS: Where else do you find inspiration / motivation for your art? Do you listen to music, hike through the woods, drink herbal tea while watching Syfy or Nat Geo?

L.T.: I love to spend time outdoors taking long walks with my dogs, or in my garden. Nature gives me the most inspiration. When I lived in California, I lived next to a redwood forest. It was amazing, and I loved the light. Now that I’m in Spokane, the light is different, darker, but I’m still close to nature and enjoy many of the walking trails and parks throughout town. 

I often meditate before I paint. It puts me in a calm, receptive mood. Puts me in “the zone” so to speak. The zone is where I find my flow, transcend self imposed limitations, and let creativity lead me. I also love to travel, and find lots of inspiration from that.

SnS: Travel is always good. Do you have any destination goals?

L.T.: Oh, so many! I’d like to visit Denmark, Norway, Spain, Vienna, Prague, and Japan. Here in the states, I’d like to visit New Orleans, but not during Mardi Gras. I don’t enjoy crowds that big.

SnS: Me either, but I do enjoy how layered and detailed your paintings are. How long does it usually take you to complete a project?

L.T.: It depends. Often I work in a series of three paintings that relate to each other, and work on them simultaneously. Those can take a few days, to a week, to complete. Some paintings take longer. I may put a layer of paint on them and then let them sit for a few weeks, or months, while I contemplate what to do next. Sometimes I complete something within a day or two, when I can visualize clearly what I want it to look like.

SnS: Has your art changed over time? 

L.T.: My art was much darker when I was younger, probably due to residual teen angst 😉 It changed as I grew up, and when I got married, but one of the biggest changes came after I had my daughter, not long after 9/11. My art became lighter, more joyful, and more colorful as a result. I guess it was my way of pushing back the darkness for myself and my family, and to create a positive atmosphere. 

Moving to Spokane changed it again as I had to get used to the difference in the light. Spokane is darker than California, and has an actual winter.

SnS: what do you think of the Spokane Art scene?

L.T.: The local art scene is small but good. I see a lot of enthusiasm here, and I’d like to think that means that we’ll keep moving forward, keep growing, spreading beauty and hope.

SnS: Well you are doing a good job of that. 🙂 Did you / do you have a day job?

L.T.: This is my job. In the past I have worked for art galleries, non-profit art organizations, and I’ve done some graphic design work. I worked at a summer stock theater in Custer State Park for six years, during college. I painted sets, ran the box office, whatever they needed. I had lots of other boring jobs in between.

Fun fact: my first job, at age 15, was as a tour guide in a commercial cave in the Black Hills of South Dakota where I grew up.

SnS: Obviously, you’ve been working on, around, art and artists a while now. What are your goals as an artist? Have you reached or surpassed any previous goals?

L.T.: One of my goals is to keep trying new techniques and ideas, to stretch myself as an artist. I’m always searching for new ways to express my ideas. 

In the past year, I’ve been experimenting with encaustic, and that has been really good for me. Working with beeswax and pigment forces me to give up control over the end result, and let the materials take over.

SnS: Speaking of control. . . If you could control space and time, travel through it to enhance your art, where would you go and why?

L.T.: I love to visit beautiful places like national parks, gardens, the ocean, lakes, etc, and this past week I went to Palm Springs to see the desert bloom in Anza Borrego State Park, and Joshua Tree National Park.

As for going back in time? When I spent that time on a Greek island, I was fascinated by the ancient ruins and old marble mines where they found the marble to use for sculptures on the Parthenon in Athens. I’ve often wondered what it would have been like to live in ancient Greece, so I’d visit there.

SnS: Nice! Would you ride along with “The Doctor”, H.G. Wells, “Doc Brown”, or “Bill & Ted”?

L.T.: Probably none of them. I’d rather bring my dogs instead.

SnS: Well that sort of answered my next question of, which would you prefer as a companion: a dog, cat, squid, or squirrel?

L.T.: Beside my dogs, I do have a cat I adore, so she’d have to come too.

SnS: Okay, final question. Do you have any causes or charities you support that you’d like to share here?

L.T.: I love PBS and NPR. I support local public radio stations and television. I’ve donated to the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, and the Humane Society in the past year.

If you would like to see more of Linnea Tobias’ work, you can find her locally at: Pottery Place, Artemesia in the Women’s Club on South Hill, Lindaman’s, the Chocolate Apothecary, and during the summer, Entree Gallery in Priest Lake, ID.

On line you can find her at: LinneaTobias.com , Etsy , Instagram , or Facebook

Catching up with artist Kelly Loder’s “Emotion in Motion!”

Catching up with artist Kelly Loder’s “Emotion in Motion!”

 

S&S: Hello Kelly. Welcome to the new year! I’d like to start off by looking back at the important events of 2016. Did you meet your goals for the year? Was there anything that you feel has changed, or enhanced your art?

Kelly: Hello! It is always a goal to show my work throughout the year and have a piece sell. I displayed work at the Loft of Missoula, the ZACC, and the Stensrud Event Hall in 2016 and sold at least two paintings and several framed ink prints.

Anything that enhanced my art? Well, I’d say life. 2016 was an interesting year for most everyone. Lots of emotion which went straight into my work.

S&S: What are you looking forward to this year? New goals?

Kelly: In May, Candice Rhea and I will be doing a conjunctive showing at the Loft in Missoula. It’s a great space, large and open. I’m looking forward to that.

One of my goals this year is to get back into doing live art to live music. I’m an introvert for the most part. Though maybe with a little help from my friends I’ll be able to do this 🙂  My goals have always consisted of doing my best to vary my style, and I like to raise more questions (in the content of my work) than can be answered. The mystery awakens ~ but is never quite understood.

S&S: Please describe your type of art and the mediums you work within. Which medium is your favorite? What do you call your style?

Kelly: I utilize pastel, acrylics, and charcoal mainly using canvas, wood, or driftwood as a surface. My favorite is probably charcoal on paper. The dark on white background is very dramatic, and allows me to really show emotional content in my drawings. 

I would say my style is abstract, sometimes with forms and figures based loosely in reality. Many of these have forms influenced by the female face and figure. I think it’s quite original myself. My work is kind of hard to explain though.

S&S: How long have you been an artist? What got you started?

Kelly: I have been working an artist since 1994 when I went to high school in Seneca Valley, Harmony, PA. Before that I was a flutist, in my former high school in Germantown, TN where I studied with a private instructor. My family moved approximately every two years while I was growing up. When I moved from TN to PA during my Sophomore year, I switched from the flute to art. I was clueless in another new school, and Josh Reynolds, as I recall, was the one who pointed me toward the art corridor. I was always a creative person, and James Rettinger was my first art teacher / artistic influence.

During the latter part of my high school career, I spent half my time in the art department working on a large multi-medium collage / mural on plexiglass. I would get passes to leave other classes to go work on art projects. The key was getting my school work done ahead of time so I could have the extra time in art. The collage turned out great and stood in the school lobby for a long time. Art class was the only place I felt half way comfortable. I loved the freedom of expression. .

At the time, I had a variety of body ailments due to stress, as well as my budding Bipolar situation. I will never forget how low the lows got. It was during this time that I began Art Therapy. Practicing Art Therapy is my kind of meditation.  Creating art is very cathartic.

S&S: What inspires you to create? (nature, music, people, drama, zen gardens, what?)

Kelly: Music! The music I listen to is usually upbeat, or carries forward momentum. I prefer instrumental music as words can sometimes get in the way. Art as meditation and as therapy and healing are extremely important in my life.

S&S: Do you have a process?  (Do you have to sing, chant, or scream before addressing the canvas? Do you dance while drinking a margarita, or do you just binge on coffee and chocolate to get revved up? (Personally, I favor the coffee and chocolate while writing 😉

Kelly: I have several processes for different artistic purposes. For mood, I enjoy a candle on, some incense lingering in the air, and music as preparation to get into “the zone” 🙂 

S&S: I’m no artist, so can you tell me, what is “the zone”?

Kelly: The zone happens when I’ve relaxed into my creation enough to find figures, people, beings expressing themselves, showing their forms to me from within whatever I am working on. Once I find them, I just bring them forward.

S&S: Who are your favorite artists alive or dead? They can be from any genre or medium.

Kelly: My favorite artists include Montana’s Jay Rummel, Albert P. Ryder, and Picasso. Some of my most favorite artists are also good friends. For instance, Candice Rhea (Serenity Creations on facebook), and Akhilesh also on facebook.

S&S: What does art mean to you? Why do you do it?

Kelly: Art is my soul’s survival. Art is passion. Art is everywhere. The creation of art, for me, is “Emotion in Motion”, which is the collective title for my work.

S&S: If you could travel to any place / time for your art, where would you go and why?

Kelly: I would travel through my subconscious mind. Maybe then I would know which direction to start. I believe being in the “Right Time, Right Place” brings success. I would prefer to travel to the places where I wold be steadily successful with selling work. I would also like to travel to enrich my life and my art. I really do not have a definitive place in mind. Just the right time, right place!

S&S: And finally, do you have any special projects / charities you support?

Kelly: I do. I hold Art Therapy meetings at my home, as well as more informal “Arting” sessions. I work with both youth and adults. 

S&S: Please describe an Art Therapy session. Is it in a group or more individuals?

Kelly: I’ve only hosted a few Art Therapy sessions. Mostly they’ve been individual based, but it’s possible to have groups. Depending on the situation, the person either brings their own supplies or they use what I give them, then they just begin. Sometimes they talk while creating, other times they are quiet.

Art can be very therapeutic as the act of creation is very empowering. A person can take something negative going on in their life and turn it into a positive, maybe even beautiful thing.

Abstract artist Kelly Loder certainly does this! Her creations are both beautiful and evocative. Thank you Kelly for sharing your talent with us. 

If you would like to see more of Kelly’s work please visit her website kellyloder.webs.com or her facebook page Emotion in Motion.