Deep Blue Emotion by Kelley J. Sullivan

Deep Blue Emotion by Kelley J. Sullivan

Earlier this summer, I went to ArtFest with a friend. We took our time walking through, looking at all the amazing art, and talking to the artists. A few of them stood out to us, not just for their artistic offerings, but for their kind and fun personalities. Kelley J. Sullivan was one of them.

Despite the heat of the day, Kelley’s vendor tent was an oasis of cool. Cool paintings, cool water, and a cool artist. Inviting us in, she offered us bottles of water, answered our questions, and was just generally kind and amazing. Her paintings, all done in shades of blue, created the illusion of non-sweat inducing temperatures, and we found ourselves hanging out longer than we had intended. When we finally left to finish our tour of ArtFest, we ended up circling back to her booth. My friend couldn’t leave without purchasing some of her cards, and I couldn’t leave without asking for an interview. I just had to share her talent with you all.

Please keep reading to learn more about the deep, blue, emotions of Kelley J. Sullivan.

SnS: First of all, Kelley, thanks for interviewing with me. I am fascinated with your work. Please describe your style of painting.

KJS: It’s hard to peg my style down to one category. I’ve heard everything from abstract landscapes, to abstract impressionism. For me, the category has never mattered. In my mind, I paint emotional landscapes or models of inner-life. Every painting is a moment in time, tied to an emotional state that everyone has likely felt at some point.

SnS: Looking at your work, that is a great description! So, what drew you to the blue palette?

KJS: I’ve always felt more comfortable using a cool palette. When I try to go branch out into brighter, warmer colors it begins to feel forced. I figure if I’m trying to put some sort of my truth onto canvas, I need to stick to what feels right.

SnS: I like that. After ArtFest I started following you on Facebook. You’ve posted pictures of our art on your page, and many of them have a short poem attached. Do you write those, or are they quotes?

KJS: I write everything I post. (There may have been one exception, but I would have quoted the author) I have an absolute love affair with the written word, and write something for almost every piece I paint. I had originally intended to include the poem on the back of each painting, but realized it may change the experience of the viewer. 

I think it is more important for each viewer to have their own personal experience with each piece. Without interjecting my meaning onto it. However, I have included it when requested.

SnS: Good to know. So, how did you become an artist? Did (or do) you have a more traditional job?

KJS: I started creating from the moment I was born. Although I’ve held an expansive array of other jobs, art was always a consistent passion in the background. In 2008 a friend saw some of my paintings and urged me to start sharing them. I started small, showing in local coffee shops and entering every online competition I could find. As I gained exposure, my career just started growing in an amazingly organic manner. I feel so lucky to be at a point in my life where I am able to do what I love as my sole career.

SnS: That is a blessing! Do you have any artists (of any genre) you admire?

KJS: There are so many. I find that most of the artists I am in love with aren’t necessarily world famous. They are artists I find on Instagram, at art fairs, or hanging in coffee shops as I travel. I am definitely drawn towards edgier styles of art. Some of my favorites right now are Walt Hall, Annie Owens,  Kathryn Hackney, and James Lipnickas.

SnS: What do you do to get in the mood to paint? What inspires you?

KJS: Music is probably my biggest inspiration. With art as my full time job, I often have to create when I just don’t feel like it. If I put on some sad, moody music with good lyrical content it can usually put me in a place where I can open up and paint.

SnS: You seem to always be on the move. What do you do to relax?

KJS: Relax? Who has time for that! 🙂 But on the rare occasion when I am able to, I head outside. Hiking and camping are fuel for my soul. I’ve also found that as I am getting older, quality time with people who challenge me, in a positive way, can do wonders to help me recharge. I’m lucky to be surrounded by an incredible community.

SnS: Community is important. So what do you think is the one thing about you that people would be surprised to know?

KJS: Probably that putting my art into the world was one of the hardest things I have ever done. I painted solely for myself for years, and never had any intention of showing it to anyone. I had rooms full of unfinished paintings that had never seen daylight. I was terrified that no one would understand what I was doing. I’m still in awe that some connect to it.

SnS: Well it is beautiful, and lucky for us your friend pushed you to show it. So here is my favorite cheesy question. If you could host a picnic for anyone, living or dead, past or present, who would you invite and why?

KJS: I’m EXTREMELY sentimental over the people in my life that have shown me kindness, support, or encouragement. It would be one hell of a party. I would love to invite all the people that I have appreciated. It could have been a kind word on a hard day, or a huge show of encouragement. Some would not be surprised, but I bet quite a few would be shocked to receive the invitation.

SnS: I love that. That’s a great attitude to have. You were very kind to me and my friend at ArtFest. Do you have any causes or charities you support, other than overheated bloggers?

KJS: I am a board member of S.L.A.M. – Support Local Artists and Musicians, in Montana.

SnS: Sweet beans! You are a busy woman. Thanks Kelley for sharing your time and your talent with us all.

If you would like to see more of Kelley’s work. . .

Featured artist at ERA Landmark in Bozeman, MT. Sept. 8th.

INTROSPECTION, an ab-ex group show at FOLD Gallery in Los Angeles, CA. through Sept. 18th.

Bozeman Open Studio Tour – October 21 & 22.

Sip and SLAM Bozeman – September and October.

Or follow her on Instagram or facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Catching up with artist Kelly Loder’s “Emotion in Motion!”

Catching up with artist Kelly Loder’s “Emotion in Motion!”

 

S&S: Hello Kelly. Welcome to the new year! I’d like to start off by looking back at the important events of 2016. Did you meet your goals for the year? Was there anything that you feel has changed, or enhanced your art?

Kelly: Hello! It is always a goal to show my work throughout the year and have a piece sell. I displayed work at the Loft of Missoula, the ZACC, and the Stensrud Event Hall in 2016 and sold at least two paintings and several framed ink prints.

Anything that enhanced my art? Well, I’d say life. 2016 was an interesting year for most everyone. Lots of emotion which went straight into my work.

S&S: What are you looking forward to this year? New goals?

Kelly: In May, Candice Rhea and I will be doing a conjunctive showing at the Loft in Missoula. It’s a great space, large and open. I’m looking forward to that.

One of my goals this year is to get back into doing live art to live music. I’m an introvert for the most part. Though maybe with a little help from my friends I’ll be able to do this 🙂  My goals have always consisted of doing my best to vary my style, and I like to raise more questions (in the content of my work) than can be answered. The mystery awakens ~ but is never quite understood.

S&S: Please describe your type of art and the mediums you work within. Which medium is your favorite? What do you call your style?

Kelly: I utilize pastel, acrylics, and charcoal mainly using canvas, wood, or driftwood as a surface. My favorite is probably charcoal on paper. The dark on white background is very dramatic, and allows me to really show emotional content in my drawings. 

I would say my style is abstract, sometimes with forms and figures based loosely in reality. Many of these have forms influenced by the female face and figure. I think it’s quite original myself. My work is kind of hard to explain though.

S&S: How long have you been an artist? What got you started?

Kelly: I have been working an artist since 1994 when I went to high school in Seneca Valley, Harmony, PA. Before that I was a flutist, in my former high school in Germantown, TN where I studied with a private instructor. My family moved approximately every two years while I was growing up. When I moved from TN to PA during my Sophomore year, I switched from the flute to art. I was clueless in another new school, and Josh Reynolds, as I recall, was the one who pointed me toward the art corridor. I was always a creative person, and James Rettinger was my first art teacher / artistic influence.

During the latter part of my high school career, I spent half my time in the art department working on a large multi-medium collage / mural on plexiglass. I would get passes to leave other classes to go work on art projects. The key was getting my school work done ahead of time so I could have the extra time in art. The collage turned out great and stood in the school lobby for a long time. Art class was the only place I felt half way comfortable. I loved the freedom of expression. .

At the time, I had a variety of body ailments due to stress, as well as my budding Bipolar situation. I will never forget how low the lows got. It was during this time that I began Art Therapy. Practicing Art Therapy is my kind of meditation.  Creating art is very cathartic.

S&S: What inspires you to create? (nature, music, people, drama, zen gardens, what?)

Kelly: Music! The music I listen to is usually upbeat, or carries forward momentum. I prefer instrumental music as words can sometimes get in the way. Art as meditation and as therapy and healing are extremely important in my life.

S&S: Do you have a process?  (Do you have to sing, chant, or scream before addressing the canvas? Do you dance while drinking a margarita, or do you just binge on coffee and chocolate to get revved up? (Personally, I favor the coffee and chocolate while writing 😉

Kelly: I have several processes for different artistic purposes. For mood, I enjoy a candle on, some incense lingering in the air, and music as preparation to get into “the zone” 🙂 

S&S: I’m no artist, so can you tell me, what is “the zone”?

Kelly: The zone happens when I’ve relaxed into my creation enough to find figures, people, beings expressing themselves, showing their forms to me from within whatever I am working on. Once I find them, I just bring them forward.

S&S: Who are your favorite artists alive or dead? They can be from any genre or medium.

Kelly: My favorite artists include Montana’s Jay Rummel, Albert P. Ryder, and Picasso. Some of my most favorite artists are also good friends. For instance, Candice Rhea (Serenity Creations on facebook), and Akhilesh also on facebook.

S&S: What does art mean to you? Why do you do it?

Kelly: Art is my soul’s survival. Art is passion. Art is everywhere. The creation of art, for me, is “Emotion in Motion”, which is the collective title for my work.

S&S: If you could travel to any place / time for your art, where would you go and why?

Kelly: I would travel through my subconscious mind. Maybe then I would know which direction to start. I believe being in the “Right Time, Right Place” brings success. I would prefer to travel to the places where I wold be steadily successful with selling work. I would also like to travel to enrich my life and my art. I really do not have a definitive place in mind. Just the right time, right place!

S&S: And finally, do you have any special projects / charities you support?

Kelly: I do. I hold Art Therapy meetings at my home, as well as more informal “Arting” sessions. I work with both youth and adults. 

S&S: Please describe an Art Therapy session. Is it in a group or more individuals?

Kelly: I’ve only hosted a few Art Therapy sessions. Mostly they’ve been individual based, but it’s possible to have groups. Depending on the situation, the person either brings their own supplies or they use what I give them, then they just begin. Sometimes they talk while creating, other times they are quiet.

Art can be very therapeutic as the act of creation is very empowering. A person can take something negative going on in their life and turn it into a positive, maybe even beautiful thing.

Abstract artist Kelly Loder certainly does this! Her creations are both beautiful and evocative. Thank you Kelly for sharing your talent with us. 

If you would like to see more of Kelly’s work please visit her website kellyloder.webs.com or her facebook page Emotion in Motion.

Coming soon!

Coming soon!

An interview with the People’s Choice winner of the “Origins of Fear” exhibit at the Little Dog Art Gallery

There are still 3 days left to vote. If you haven’t stopped by to experience the chilling art work or to cast your ballot yet, you’d better run down there. RUN, RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!

Then, stay tuned guys and ghouls, to find out who caused a shiver to run up the collective spines of all those visiting the gallery this month, and learn just how twisted they really are! Muahahahahahahahaha!